‘GARDEN OF ENGLAND’ INSPIRES THE LAUNCH OF KENT CRISPS

A new brand of crisps designed to emphasize the landscape and many flavors of the Garden of England is Kent is coming out this month known simply as Kent Crisps.  The Kent Crisps will come from potatoes that are grown in the region and will be seasoned in four different flavors that are notable for their oddity: Sea Salt and Biddenden Cider vinegar, Oyster and Vinegar, Sea Salt, and Ashmore Cheese and Onion.

The range will go on sale at over sixty farm shops offering up 40g packets of crisps in small serving sizes as well as at many independent fine food specialists, and delis spread all over Kent.   Future plans include expansion of the brand across the South East into visitor attractions, hotels, and pubs.

The Kent Crisps are the product of Quex Foods which is a subdivision of Quex Park Estate.  All of the crisps only offer the best in natural colours and flavours and will be manufactured using only sustainable methods.

Anthony Curwen, Quex Foods managing director, said: “We have selected flavours that celebrate Kent produce and tastes associated with the county. In addition, our crisp packets show imagery representative of the county’s fine heritage. Other flavours are planned and we hope the people of Kent, its visitors and those from further afield who appreciate the Garden of England will be proud to enjoy them.”

Only quality Kent potatoes grown in fields surrounding Quex Park in the Kentish village of Birchington are used. Varieties are Lady Rosetta, Lady Claire, Lady Jo and Hermes. The farm at Quex Park is also growing its own crop with the first harvest due in July.

Anthony added: “The response we’ve had so far from people who have tried them has been amazing; the Oyster and Vinegar flavour has been singled out as being very different from anything currently available.”

The Flavours

Ashmore Kentish Cheese is a cheddar-style made by the Cheesemakers of Canterbury. It is muslin-wrapped and pressed for two days in traditional 19th century presses. Then it’s unwrapped and placed on aged pine shelves to mature for at least five months. Each cheese is turned and stroked daily.
Biddenden Cider is produced at Kent’s oldest trading vineyard from farm-pressed Kentish culinary and dessert apples. Available in sweet, medium and dry, the ciders have won numerous awards including CAMRA’s prestigious Cider of the Year accolade.
Oysters are synonymous with Kent and have been harvested in Whitstable since Roman times. Whitstable holds an annual oyster festival in celebration of its famous produce.
Sea salt production was once an important industry for the county, with origins dating back to the Iron Age. Indeed, Kent’s ancient relationship with the sea is hardly surprising as it boasts 350 miles of spectacular coastline.